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Turbochargers Report

  • Publication Date:February 2012
  • Publisher:Supplier Business
  • Product Type: Report
  • Pages:69

This second edition Turbocharger Report examines the current market drivers affecting this sector including fuel economy and CO2 emissions, engine downsizing and criterion emissions.

The report goes on to provide market dynamics and forecasts for light-duty and medium and heavy duty engines and features a detailed section on the latest technologies in this sector.

Furthermore, the report considers the future of turbocharging and features the major market participants.

Report Background

Although the title of this report refers specifically to turbochargers, which are superchargers powered by the pressure of the exhaust system, its scope also includes mechanically- or electrically-powered superchargers and the various combinations and subgroups of the three types that are finding their way into both the light and heavy vehicle powertrain sectors. As in common usage language, although turbochargers are a specific type of supercharger, the term 'supercharger' will be used to refer only to mechanically- or electrically-driven superchargers.

Superchargers and turbochargers have been deployed on internal combustion engines (ICE) since the early years of the twentieth century, and although they have remained in use on heavy commercial vehicle diesel engines, they went out of fashion for many years on gasoline engines until a resurgence during the 1970s when they were used to increase power output. More recently, with increasing pressure to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions of both greenhouse gas and criterion noxious exhaust substances, the technology has been applied to enable engine downsizing while maintaining similar power output.

Consequently, turbocharging and supercharging are now regarded as critical technologies within powertrain development.

  • Introduction
    • The concept
    • History
    • The choice: turbocharger or supercharger?
    • Turbocharger sectors
    • Heavy duty
    • Light duty
    • Performance
    • Small diesels
  • Market drivers
    • Fuel economy and CO2 emissions
    • Europe
    • The United States
    • Japan
    • China
    • South Korea
    • Other countries
    • Engine downsizing
    • Ford EcoBoost
    • GM Ecotec
    • Criterion emissions
    • Light-duty vehicles
    • Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles
  • Market dynamics and forecasts
    • Light-duty engines
    • Europe
    • North America
    • Greater China
    • Japan
    • South Korea
    • South Asia
    • South America
    • The Middle East and Africa
    • Medium- and heavy-duty
    • Europe
    • North America
    • Greater China
    • Japan and South Korea
    • South Asia
    • South America
    • Technologies
    • Compressors
    • Reciprocating compressors
    • Screw compressors
    • Centrifugal compressors
    • Bearing systems
    • Micro turbocharging
    • Waste-gated turbochargers
    • Turbo-compounding
    • Twin-scroll turbochargers
    • Variable geometry turbochargers
    • Multi-stage turbocharging
    • Parallel twin turbocharging
    • Sequential twin turbocharging
    • Regulated twin turbocharging
    • Three-stage turbocharging
    • Twin vortices supercharger
    • Multi-speed superchargers
    • Electric superchargers
    • Charge air coolers (intercoolers)
    • The Future of Turbocharging
    • Electronic controls and new materials
    • Titanium compressor impellers
    • Assisted turbocharging
    • Major market participants
    • Honeywell/Garrett
    • Continental/Siemens VDO
    • Robert Bosch/Mahle Joint Venture
    • BorgWarner
    • Cummins/Holset
    • IHI Corporation
    • Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI)
    • Eaton Corporation
  • TABLE OF FIGURES
    • Figure 1: Basic turbocharger design Source: BorgWarner
    • Figure 2: Typical transient response comparison at 1,500rpm, turbocharger vs supercharger Source: Rotrak
    • Figure 3: Supercharged Audi 3.0-litre TFSI V6 Source: Audi
    • Figure 4: Schematic diagram of BorgWarner's eBooster Source: BorgWarner
    • Figure 5: VanDyne s SuperTurbo Source: VanDyne
    • Figure 6 China's fuel economy standards programme Source: Volkswagen China
    • Figure 7 Fuel economy standards in mpg (US gallon) to 2015 Source: Green Car Congress, ICCT
    • Figure 8 The effects of downsizing on fuel consumption Source: Ricardo
    • Figure 9 Cadillac 2.0T engine Source: GM
    • Figure 10 CO reductions in the EU, Japan and the US, 2000 - 2010 Source: Implats
    • Figure 11 NOx reductions in the EU, Japan and the US, 2000 - 2010 Source: Implats
    • Figure 12 Diesel PM reductions in the EU, Japan and the US, 2000 - 2010 Source:Implats
    • Figure 13 HC reductions in the EU, Japan and the US, 2000 - 2010 Source: Implats
    • Figure 14 Emissions standards timetable in selected countries, 2001 - 2010
    • Figure 15 NOx limits in the EU, Japan and the US, 1995 - 2010 (g/kWh)
    • Figure 16: PM limits in the EU, Japan and the US, 1995 - 2010 (g/kWh)
    • Figure 17 Global light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 18 Europe light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 19 North America light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 20 Greater China light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 21 Japan light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 22 South Korea light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011- 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 23 South Asia light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 24 South America light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 25 Middle East & Africa light-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 26 Global medium- and heavy-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 27 North America medium- and heavy-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 28: Greater China medium- and heavy-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 29 Japan & South Korea medium- and heavy-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 30: South Asia medium- and heavy-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 31 South America medium- and heavy-duty engine production forecast by aspiration type, 2011 - 2017 Source: IHS Automotive
    • Figure 32 Compressor map of a turbocharger for passenger car applications Source: BorgWarner
    • Figure 33 Fiat two-cylinder MultiAir engine Source: Fiat
    • Figure 34 Scania 12-litre engine with EGR and turbo-compounding Source: Scania
    • Figure 35 Holset VGT™ Turbocharging Technology Source: Cummins Turbo Technologies
    • Figure 36 BMW bi-turbo Source: BMW
    • Figure 37 Exploded view of a Rotrak variable-speed supercharger Source: Rotrak
    • Figure 38 Controlled Power Technologies electric supercharger Source: Controlled Power Technologies
    • Figure 39 Antonov dual-speed supercharger Source: Antonov
    • Figure 40 Turbocharging technologies for high-pressure charging Source: Hiroshi Uchida
    • Figure 41 IHI RHE Series turbocharger Source: IHI Turbo America
    • Figure 42 Figure HI RHF Series turbocharger Source: IHI Turbo America
  • LIST OF TABLES
    • Table 1: US emissions standards for light-duty vehicles, to five years/50,000 miles(g/mile) Source: DieselNet
    • Table 2: Japan emissions limits for light gasoline & LPG vehicles (g/km) Source: Japan Department of the Environment
    • Table 3: Japan emissions limits for light diesel vehicles (g/km) Source: Japan Department of the Environment
    • Table 4: Euro 5 emissions limits for light gasoline vehicles (g/km) Source: DieselNet
    • Table 5: Euro 5 emissions limits for light diesel vehicles (g/km) Source: DieselNet
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