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In-building wireless solutions
Stimulating greater mobile usage through better indoor coverage

  • Publication Date:June 2006
  • Publisher:Visiongain
  • Product Type: Report
  • Pages:111

In-building wireless solutions Stimulating greater mobile usage through better indoor coverage

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As mobile subscriber growth reaches saturation, one solution to increasing mobile traffic stems from increased indoor usage of the mobile phone. In 2006, in-building mobile account for approximately 30% of total mobile revenues. However, upwards of 70% of 3G data traffic originates indoors. Nokia's recent agreement with RadioFrame Networks that will see Nokia sell, distribute and support RadioFrame's picocell solutions to mobile network operators will prove a major shot for this market and is indicative of a growing focus on the benefits of in-building solutions. Why is in-building coverage so important and how can you maximise on the opportunity? What are the costs and ROI associated with each technology approach? This report will give you the answers.

Given the current infrastructure, coverage, capacity and frequency constraints limit the QoS customers expect indoors and negatively impacts mobile usage. Better indoor coverage can also help operators reduce churn through a differentiated service offering. While mobile phone penetration has overtaken the number of landline phones in many parts of the world, cellular traffic still lags its fixed-line counterpart in terms of minutes of use (MOUs). Similarly, while the number of mobile-only households is growing, the growth is slow and many households are unwilling to displace their home phones. In-building wireless solutions (IBwS) have emerged as a significant opportunity to encourage mobile usage and fixed-to-mobile substitution. This report will help you understand how you can benefit from a greater focus on IBwS.

In the enterprise segment, getting coverage within office buildings has always posed a challenge for cellular systems. All indications are that businesses are very serious about deploying wireless applications. This is great news for wireless carriers who see new revenue generating opportunities. However, there must be reliable, seamless and consistent coverage within structures of all sizes and building materials. How can this be achieved? Purchase this timely report to find out.

The fundamental purpose of IBwS is to extend strong, clear cellular signals inside homes, buildings or public venues, such as airports or stadiums. What are the different usage scenarios between homes, offices and other building? What are the implications for operators? This report will tell you.

This 110-page report analyses different business and operating issues that will affect the decision about which IBwS technology approach to deploy. It answers questions including:

  • Where do the biggest opportunities lie for in-building revenue generation?
  • What types of IBwS exist and what are their advantages, disadvantage and unique considerations?
  • What are the business models and which ones are the most economically viable?
  • What are the indoor coverage and capacity demands of 3G and how can they be overcome?
  • Will Wi-Fi, WiMAX, VoWLAN and VoIP undercut the need for in-building mobile or do any of these represent an opportunity for operators?
  • How does building or venue type and size affect the choice of technology?
  • 1 Executive Summary
    • 1.1 The Need for In-Building Wireless Coverage
    • 1.2 How IBwS Works
    • 1.3 Types of In-Building Wireless Solutions
      • 1.3.1 Passive Systems
      • 1.3.2 Active Systems
      • 1.3.3 Hybrid Systems
    • 1.4 System Costs
    • 1.5 Who Pays for IBwS Deployment?
    • 1.6 Conclusions
  • 2 Introduction
    • 2.1 In-Building Wireless Solutions Defined
    • 2.2 IBwS Drivers
      • 2.2.1 Employee Efficiency
      • 2.2.2 Quality of Service and Churn
      • 2.2.3 Wireline Replacement
      • 2.2.4 Tenant Inducement
    • 2.3 Major Technologies Considered in This Report
    • 2.4 Methodology
    • 2.5 Aims and Focus of the Report
  • 3 Strategic Overview
    • 3.1 Basic Considerations
      • 3.1.2 Picocells
        • 3.1.2.1 Picocells and the Business Case for 3G
      • 3.1.3 The Evolution of In-Building Wireless
        • 3.1.3.1 A Brief History
    • 3.2 Various Alternative In-Building Solutions
      • 3.2.1 Passive Systems
        • 3.2.1.1 Passive System Pros and Cons
      • 3.2.2 Active Systems
      • 3.2.21 Active System Pros and Cons
      • 3.2.3 Hybrid Systems
    • 3.3 In-Building Issues to Evaluate
      • 3.3.1 Single- or Multi-Carrier
      • 3.3.2 Applications
      • 3.3.3 Performance
      • 3.3.4 Expandability
      • 3.3.5 Deployment Disruption
      • 3.3.6 Manageability
      • 3.3.7 Capacity
      • 3.3.8 Costs
      • 3.3.9 Security
        • 3.3.9.1 Specific WLAN Security Concerns
        • 3.3.9.2 Wireless Networks are Targets
        • 3.3.9.3 Interference and Jamming
        • 3.3.9.4 MAC Authentication
        • 3.3.9.4 Ad Hoc Versus Infrastructure Modes
        • 3.3.9.5 Denial or Degradation of Service
        • 3.3.9.6 Guest and Invisible Intruders
        • 3.3.9.7 Rogue Access Points
        • 3.3.9.8 The Insecurity of 802.11
        • 3.3.9.8.1 Authentication
        • 3.3.9.8.2 Key Management
        • 3.3.9.8.3 Additional WEP Concerns
      • 3.3.10 WLAN Security Solutions
        • 3.3.10.1 Dynamic WEP
        • 3.3.10.2 Other Dynamic WEP Problems
      • 3.3.11 EAP, LEAP and 802.1x
        • 3.3.11.1 Unresolved issues with 802.1x
      • 3.3.12 Firewalls and Encrypted Tunnels
        • 3.3.12.1 Firewall/VPN Solution Challenges
    • 3.4 Universal Security Solution
  • 4 In-Home Wireless Access Solution
    • 4.1 The In-Home Wireless Networking Market
    • 4.2 In-Home Network Considerations
      • 4.2.1 Wi-Fi
      • 4.2.2 No Silver Bullet
      • 4.2.3 Which Wire is Superior?
        • 4.2.3.1 Coaxial in the Lead
        • 4.2.3.2 Home PNA
        • 4.2.3.3 HomePlug
        • 4.2.3.4 Motorola's Approach
        • 4.2.3.5 A Hybrid Solution
        • 4.2.3.6 Spanish Alternative
        • 4.2.3.7 Hong Kong Deployment
    • 4.3 The Near Future
      • 4.3.1 IEEE 802.11n
      • 4.3.2 Ultrawideband
      • 4.3.3 Wi-Fi vs. UWB
    • 4.4 The Challenge
  • 5 In-Building Wireless Architecture Considerations
    • 5.1 Impact of In-Building Issues on System Choice
      • 5.1.1 Performance Issues
      • 5.1.2 Cost Issues
      • 5.1.3 Deployment Disruption
      • 5.1.4 Manageability Issues
    • 5.2 Preparing for the Future
      • 5.2.1 Frequency and Technology Support
      • 5.2.2 Cost Reductions
    • 5.3 Applications Support
      • 5.3.1 In-building Wireless Voice
      • 5.3.2 On-the-Street Wireless Voice
      • 5.3.3 In-Building Standard Data Connectivity
      • 5.3.4 On-the-Street Standard Data Connectivity
      • 5.3.5 In-Building RFID
      • 5.3.6 On-the-Street RFID
      • 5.3.7 In-Building VoIP
      • 5.3.8 On-the-Street VoIP
    • 5.3 Case Studies
      • 5.3.1 New York Luxury Hotel
      • 5.3.2 Telecommunications Equipment Manufacturer
    • 5.4 Bridging Applications
    • 5.5 In-Building Technology Trends
    • 5.6 Differentiators
  • 6 Deployments and Prominent Players
    • 6.1 A Broad Range of Solutions and Players
      • 6.1.1 Andrew Corporation
      • 6.1.2 EMS Technologies Inc.
      • 6.1.3 In Building Wireless
      • 6.1.4 InnerWireless
        • 6.1.5. ip.access
      • 6.1.6 LGC Wireless
      • 6.1.7 Lucent Technologies
      • 6.1.8 MobileAccess
      • 6.1.9 Radio Frequency Systems
      • 6.1.10 3Way Networks
      • 6.1.11 Nokia and RadioFrame Networks
      • 6.1.12 Ericsson
      • 6.1.13 London Underground
    • 6.2 Considerations in Choosing an IBwS
      • 6.2.1 Business Considerations
        • 6.2.1.1 Cost
        • 6.2.1.2 Vendor's Wireless Experience
        • 6.2.1.3 Is the Vendor a Full System and Solution Provider?
        • 6.2.1.4 Vendors Business Stability
        • 6.2.1.5 Wide Selection of IBwS Clients
        • 6.2.1.6 System Integration
        • 6.2.1.7 Service and Support
        • 6.2.1.8 Global Presence
      • 6.2.2 Technical Considerations
        • 6.2.2.1 Seamless Integration
        • 6.2.2.2 Cost and Coverage
        • 6.2.2.3 Performance
        • 6.2.2.4 Response Time and Delay
        • 6.2.2.5 Size and Convenience
        • 6.2.2.6 Availability of Hardware and Software
        • 6.2.2.7 Interoperability
        • 6.2.2.8 Power Management
        • 6.2.2.9 Security Considerations
  • 7 Leading Wireless Applications and Their Impact on IBwS
    • 7.1 Third Generation (3G) Mobile Service
      • 7.1.1 Network characteristics
      • 7.1.2 3G Deployment
      • 7.1.3 The Relationship Between IBwS and 3G
        • 7.1.3.1 How IBwS Helps Cellular Operators
        • 7.1.3.2 How IBwS Helps Building Owners
      • 7.1.4 The Convergence of 3G and IBwS
        • 7.1.4.1 Convergence Trends
        • 7.1.4.2 Is Convergence Necessary?
        • 7.1.4.2.1 Device Convergence
        • 7.1.4.2.2 Network Convergence
        • 7.1.4.2.3 Service Convergence
    • 7.2 Bluetooth
      • 7.2.1 The Bluetooth Market
      • 7.2.2 Bluetooth Usages
      • 7.2.3 Bluetooth and IBwS: BT's Solution
    • 7.3 Wi-Fi
      • 7.3.1 Wi-Fi Usages
      • 7.3.2 Wi-Fi and IBwS
    • 7.4 WiMAX
      • 7.4.1 WiMAX Usages
      • 7.4.2 WiMAX and IBwS
  • 8 In-Building Wireless Market Trends
    • 8.1 IBwS Benefits
      • 8.1.1 Benefits for Mobile Operators
        • 8.1.1.1 New Traffic Resulting in Increased Revenue
        • 8.1.1.2 Competitive Edge and Image
        • 8.1.1.3 Network Off-Load Frees Capacity
        • 8.1.1.4 IBwS Provides for Future Needs
        • 8.1.1.5 IBwS Boosts Growth of Mobile Internet and Applications
      • 8.1.2 Benefits and Opportunities for Neutral Hosts
      • 8.1.3 Benefits and Opportunities for Building Owners
      • 8.1.4 Benefits and Opportunities for Enterprises
      • 8.1.5 Benefits for the End-Users
    • 8.2 Hosting Trends
  • List of Tables
    • Table 3.1: Comparison of In-building Coverage Systems
    • Table 3.2: Macrocells vs picocells
    • Table 3.3: Evolution of In-building Wireless Solutions
    • Table 3.4: Prevention and Detention of Rogue Access Points
    • Table 6.3: Cost breakdown for an IBwS system
    • Table 6.1: Frequency Bands of Various Britecell Products
    • Table 7.1: 3G System Capabilities
    • Table 6.5: Technical Factors for Selecting an IBwS Vendor
    • Table 7.2: Characteristics of Different Wireless Networks
    • Table 7.3: WiMAX compared to other wireless technologies
    • Table 6.2: Comparative IBwS Products and Deployments
    • Table 6.4: Business Factors for Selecting an IBwS Vendor
  • List of Charts
    • Chart 3.1: picocell unit shipemnts, 2006-2011
    • Chart 4.1: What Consumers Want to Link to a Data Network
    • Chart 7.1: Total Worldwide In-building Wireless Revenue, 2005-2011
    • Chart 7.2: Indoor vs outdoor cellular voice traffic in the US, 2005 & 2010
    • Chart 7.3: Indoor traffic as % of total traffic for major European mobile operators
  • Appendices
    • Appendix A Lead author's profile
    • Appendix B About visiongain
    • Appendix C Report evaluation form 3 Italy
  • Companies Listed
    • 3Way Networks
    • ADC Telecommunications
    • Alltel
    • American University
    • Andrew Corporation
    • AS Scanditron
    • BellSouth
    • Broadcom
    • BT
    • Carlion Roanoke Memorial Hospital
    • Cingular Wireless
    • Cisco Systems
    • Conexant Systems
    • CopperGate
    • Daytona Speedway
    • DS2
    • EMS Technologies
    • Entropic Communications
    • Ericsson
    • Eurotel
    • FCC
    • Ford's Theatre
    • Frequenz Plus
    • Home PNA
    • HomePlug Powerline Allicance
    • Hughes
    • IEEE
    • In Building Wireless Inc.
    • Ineto Wireless
    • InnerWireless
    • Intellon Corp.
    • ip.access ltd.
    • Johnson Controls
    • Juniper Networks
    • Kiev Metro
    • LGC Wireless
    • London Underground
    • Lucent Technologies
    • Mandarin Oriental Hotel
    • Mitel
    • Mobile Access Networks
    • MobileAccess
    • Motorola
    • Multimedia over Coax Alliance (MoCA)
    • national Church of God
    • T-Mobile
    • Texas Instruments
    • Nextel
    • Nokia
    • NTT DoCoMo
    • Office Depot
    • Orange France
    • PCCW-HKT Ltd
    • PulseLink
    • Radio Frequency Systems
    • RadioFrame Networks
    • Rice Memorial Hospital
    • Ruckus Wireless
    • SBC
    • Scientific-Atlanta
    • Siemens
    • Spotwave
    • Sprint
    • STMicroelectronics
    • Sun Mirco Systems
    • U.S. Library of Congress
    • University of Maryland
    • Unlicensed Mobile Access Consortium
    • Verizon
    • Vodafone
    • Wi-Fi Alliance
    • WiMAX Forum
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