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Item Level RFID
2008-2018

  • Publication Date:July 2008
  • Publisher:IDTechEx
  • Product Type: Report
  • Pages:303

Item Level RFID 2008-2018

Item level RFID is the tagging of the smallest taggable unit of things - the piece of apparel, library book, jewellery, engineering parts and laundry are examples. It used to be thought that item level RFID meant little more than tagging very low cost retail items - something to do last of all. However, it has become big business and far more profitable than many other RFID sectors because it gives excellent paybacks to everyone, not just retailers.

We assess hundreds of case studies such as Marks & Spencer in the UK using over 100 Million RFID tags to date to tag clothing and increase sales by reducing stockouts, in addition to others such as American Apparel doing similar work and reporting sales increases by 15% to 25% when all items are available on the floor.

IDTechEx forecasts that the item level RFID business will rise from $251.79 Million in 2008 for systems including tags to $8,263.7 Million in 2018. Detailed forecasts are given including number of tag units sold over the next ten years, average tag price, and tag value, in addition to systems value. Forecasts are split by the application sectors shown below:

  • Item Level RFID - passive RFID
  • Drugs
  • Other Healthcare
  • Retail apparel
  • Consumer goods
  • Tires
  • Postal
  • Books
  • Manufacturing parts, tools
  • Archiving (documents/samples)
  • Military

Other tag applications

  • Item Level RFID - active RFID
  • Pharma/Healthcare
  • Manufacturing parts, tools
  • Archiving (samples)
  • Military
  • Other tag applications

Unique requirements

The biggest item level potential involves uniquely coding very high volume products, such as consumer goods, postal items, apparel, books, drugs and manufactured parts. These total 5-10 trillion items a year. Item level tagging therefore involves most or all of the following features and this creates technical and business challenges and benefits that are very different from those in other applications of RFID. We look at technologies which can ultimately achieve this, such as printed RFID where no silicon chip is employed in the tag.

However, it is challenging to meet the most sophisticated requirements for item level tagging and to evolve appropriate technical specifications and approval procedures for, say, mission critical aircraft parts. At the other extreme it is tough to get down to the price that justifies tagging a can of soda in a supermarket or a letter. Item level tagging has therefore started with the many lucrative intermediate requirements as shown below and it is rapidly widening in scope.

New Research

IDTechEx has invested massively in research in China, Australasia, North America, Europe and elsewhere. Experts have been widely interviewed and IDTechEx experts have distilled their own analysis.

In this report you will understand the coming playoff between Near Field UHF and HF, the evolution of standards, winners and losers, detailed paybacks by applicational sector and much more besides. It describes the next wave of very large orders - not for what is popularly believed and not where most of the industry predicts it will occur. Get ahead with this unique resource, the antidote to superficial Western newsletters, press releases and the pronouncements by interested parties about how their frequency or technology will conquer all.

Includes access to 800 case studies

Every purchase includes 12 months access to all the item level RFID case studies on the RFID Knowledgebase. This amounts to over 800 case studies. These can be searched online, with case studies being updated on a regular basis and new ones added all the time.

  • 1. EXPERIENCE OF ITEM LEVEL TAGGING - AN INTRODUCTION
    • 1.1. Library
    • 1.2. Healthcare
    • 1.3. Rented textiles/ laundry
    • 1.4. Retail apparel
    • 1.5. Footwear
    • 1.6. Gas cylinders, beer kegs
    • 1.7. Food
    • 1.8. Tires
    • 1.9. Assets
    • 1.10. Parts, components, equipment, supplies
    • 1.11. Postal
  • 2. TECHNOLOGIES
    • 2.1. Systems issues
      • 2.1.1. EPCglobal and The Internet of Things
      • 2.1.2. EPCglobal NetworkTM
      • 2.1.3. Middleware
      • 2.1.4. Read vs read write
      • 2.1.5. Early filtering of data
    • 2.2. Passive tags
    • 2.3. Active tags
      • 2.3.1. Real Time Locating Systems (RTLS)
    • 2.4. Frequencies
    • 2.5. Near Field UHF vs HF for item level tagging
    • 2.6. Radio regulations
    • 2.7. How converters can make item level RFID labels
      • 2.7.1. Low cost entry - wrapping the electronics
      • 2.7.2. Making the antenna as well
      • 2.7.3. Getting involved with chips and batteries
  • 3. NEEDS BY APPLICATIONAL SECTOR
    • 3.1. Summary
    • 3.2. Books
      • 3.2.1. Libraries
      • 3.2.2. Books in retailing
      • 3.2.3. Books at manufacture
    • 3.3. Drugs anti-counterfeiting
      • 3.3.1. Supply chain
      • 3.3.2. Attitude of legislators and the industry
    • 3.4. Compliance monitoring packages
      • 3.4.1. Patient compliance
    • 3.5. Error prevention in general
    • 3.6. HF vs UHF for pharmaceuticals and other volume products
    • 3.7. Other healthcare
      • 3.7.1. Assets
      • 3.7.2. Recording information - hearing aids etc
    • 3.8. Healthcare needs satisfied
    • 3.9. Retail items
    • 3.10. Document management and archiving
    • 3.11. Tires
    • 3.12. Aircraft and other parts and tools
    • 3.13. Postal items
    • 3.14. Military
    • 3.15. Industrial parts and equipment
      • 3.15.1. Beer kegs and gas cylinders
      • 3.15.2. Components and replacement parts
    • 3.16. Privacy issues
    • 3.17. Success factors
  • 4. STANDARDS
      • 4.1.1. Benefits of standardisation
      • 4.1.2. Types of standard
      • 4.1.3. Open and closed application systems
      • 4.1.4. Standards organisations
      • 4.1.5. Types of standard relating to item level RFID
      • 4.1.6. ISO 18000 and Gen
      • 4.1.7. Market reach of UHF vs HF standards
  • 5. MARKET FORECASTS AND TIMELINES
    • 5.1. Market growth
    • 5.2. Unique volumes and requirements
    • 5.3. Rapid change in technology
    • 5.4. Benefits
    • 5.5. Increase in printing of item level tags
    • 5.6. Impediments to item level tagging
    • 5.7. Price-Sensitivity Curve for RFID (Adoption curve)
  • 6. INTRODUCTION TO CASE STUDIES FROM RFID KNOWLEDGEBASE
    • 6.2. Select case studies
      • 6.2.1. American Apparel USA
      • 6.2.2. Best Buy USA
      • 6.2.3. Marks & Spencer UK
      • 6.2.4. Maruetsu Japan
      • 6.2.5. Wal-Mart mandate for Type 2 pharmaceuticals
      • 6.2.6. AstraZeneca Diprivan UK
      • 6.2.7. Selexyz The Netherlands
      • 6.2.8. Japanese bookstores and publishers
      • 6.2.9. US Military
      • 6.2.10. European Commission ParcelCall
  • 7. PAYBACKS
    • 7.1. Types of payback
    • 7.2. Item level potential is far greater than for any other form of RFID
    • 7.3. Checklist of types of payback
    • 7.4. Retail vs CPG manufacturers
      • 7.4.1. Retailers benefit more than suppliers
      • 7.4.2. Large retailers and high ticket benefit more than small commodity ones
      • 7.4.3. Retailers vs CPG supplier benefits
      • 7.4.4. Other figures for retail and supplier paybacks
      • 7.4.5. Multiple paybacks will be commonplace
      • 7.4.6. CPG manufacturers
    • 7.5. Healthcare
      • 7.5.1. Drug anti-counterfeiting and recalls
      • 7.5.2. Drug compliance monitoring
      • 7.5.3. Drug supply chain
      • 7.5.4. Blood
      • 7.5.5. Hospital assets
      • 7.5.6. Good Shepherd Hospital USA
    • 7.6. Books
      • 7.6.1. Publishers
      • 7.6.2. Bookshops
      • 7.6.3. Libraries
    • 7.7. Military
    • 7.8. Postal
    • 7.9. Gas cylinder and beer keg operators
    • 7.10. Aircraft and other parts and equipment
    • 7.11. Tires
    • 7.12. Other applications
    • 7.13. Lessons learned
  • APPENDIX 1: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS
  • APPENDIX 2: GLOSSARY
  • APPENDIX 3: INTRODUCTION TO RFID
  • APPENDIX 4: UBIQUITOUS ID CENTER, JAPAN
  • APPENDIX 5: EUROPEAN RADIO REGULATIONS AT UHF
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