European Market Report for Electromyogram Monitoring 2016 - MedCore

European Market Report for Electromyogram Monitoring 2016 - MedCore

  • June 2016 •
  • 85 pages •
  • Report ID: 3916496 •
  • Format: PDF
There are two distinct markets for electrodiagnostic EMGs and intra-operative electro-monitoring (IOM), which is not included in the scope of this report. Under electrodiagnostic monitoring, studies include needle, nerve conduction and evoked potentials. Needle EMG and nerve conduction studies are conducted by neurology, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists. Evoked potentials specialists include audiologists and neuro-ophthalmologists that use different types of visual, light emitting diode (LED) goggles to measure response. These responses are measured with sensors located on the skin surface around the area of interest. Electrodiagnostic EMGs look at a specific value and compares it to a normal, established value.
Most EMG devices in use today are digital and are manufactured as either desktop or portable units. Additionally, EMG devices are found within both hospitals and private care facilities, with hospitals typically having more 5-channel devices, and private care facilities usually purchasing 2-channel devices.


Electromyograph (EMG) devices measure the electrical activity in muscles and the functionality of the nervous system to find the cause of muscle malfunctions. Disorders causing nerve impairment can affect muscle function, due to improper firing of electrical pulses. Some examples of nervous system complications include: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), carpal tunnel syndrome and myasthenia gravis (MG). EMG monitoring and diagnostic capabilities are limited to nerve and muscle function and are not able to diagnose brain or spinal cord diseases.