Strategies for Colloidal Stabilization of Nanoparticles for Life Science

Strategies for Colloidal Stabilization of Nanoparticles for Life Science

  • August 2019 •
  • 13 pages •
  • Report ID: 5805220 •
  • Format: PDF
Report Includes:
- A market outlook for nanoparticles in the life science sector
- Analysis of issues related to colloidal stabilization, and discussion on current and emerging strategies to improve it
- Description of nanoparticles applications in life science such as drug and gene targeting, intracellular sensors, microfluidic devices, and biological labelling
- Information on types of colloidal dispersions for life science e.g., metal, polymer, ceramic, composite, quantum dots, and nanospheres
- An overview of existing methods for preparing colloidal dispersions in life sciences

Summary
Colloids, or colloidal dispersions, are substances composed of submicron particles (i.e., particles with dimensions between 1 nm and 1,000 nm), including nanoparticles (i.e., particles below 100 nm), dispersed in a continuous medium. The medium and the dispersed phase can be either gas, liquid or solid. Depending on the physical state of the two phases, colloidal dispersions are classified as follows -
- Foams, consisting of a gas dispersed in a liquid or a solid.
- Aerosols, formed by a liquid dispersed in a gas.
- Emulsions, made from a liquid dispersed in another liquid.
- Gels, formed by a liquid dispersed in a solid.
- Solid aerosols, consisting of a solid dispersed in a gas.
- Suspensions or sols, made from a solid dispersed in a liquid.
- Solid sols or solid suspensions, consisting of a solid dispersed in another solid.

Colloidal dispersions are biphasic systems and must not be confused with solutions, which, instead, are monophasic.