Shared Economy: WeWork, Uber, Airbnb and Lyft

Shared Economy: WeWork, Uber, Airbnb and Lyft

  • March 2020 •
  • 158 pages •
  • Report ID: 5873504 •
  • Format: PDF
Report Scope:
The sharing economy is incredibly diverse, and it would have been impractical for the analyst to try to analyze every market segment in a report like this. Instead, it has focused its research on the seven segments listed below, which account for the bulk of the market at present and in the foreseeable future.

- Mobility sharing.
- Person-to-person (P2P) finance.
- Vacation rental and room sharing.
- Coworking.
- Online talent platforms.
- Healthcare sharing.
- P2P consumer goods rentals.

Report Includes -
- 66 data tables and 14 additional tables
- A brief outline of sharing ecosystem that include providers, users, influencers, and platforms and impact thereof across major industry verticals
- Data corresponding to number of sharers, estimated value of assets share, sharing platform revenues etc.; and long-term market outlook (beyond 2024)
- Projection of future trends in the total demand for different types of assets or services (e.g., vacation accommodations), and sharing’s current/projected future penetration of each of those markets
- Company profiles of market leading players within the shared marketplace, including BlaBlaCar, Getaround, Lyft, Ola, Uber, AngelList LLC, Crowdfunder Inc., Friendsurance, Guevara and Prosper Marketplace

Summary
The global sharing economy was worth REDACTED in 2018 and is projected to climb to REDACTED by 2019 and REDACTED by 2024. P2P finance was the largest segment of the sharing economy in 2018, at REDACTED (REDACTED of the total sharing economy), followed by mobility sharing at REDACTED (REDACTED) and vacation rental and room sharing at REDACTED (REDACTED).

Reasons for Doing This Study
The sharing economy is thriving globally, generating benefits estimated at nearly REDACTED in 2018.In the process, it has disrupted traditional industries such as taxis, car rentals, and commercial real estate, and it is positioned to disrupt others.

However, for all the sharing economy’s economic promise, a number of its biggest stars, like Uber and WeWork have stumbled for lack of a viable business model.Many other, less well-known sharing startups have simply disappeared.

Legacy providers of these same goods and services are widely perceived as being on the defensive, but also enjoy significant competitive advantages. Sharing companies, legacy providers, entrepreneurs and investors all need to understand these developments in order to prosper in the sharing era.