South Korea Market Report for Surgical Booms - MedCore

South Korea Market Report for Surgical Booms - MedCore

  • May 2016 •
  • 53 pages •
  • Report ID: 3911796 •
  • Format: PDF
Surgical booms were introduced to the operating room (OR) environment in the 1990s. Initially, surgicalbooms were installed in order to reduce the clutter caused by having multiple carts surrounding thesurgeon and the operating team.Before integration became a trend in the operating room environment, booms were not utilized to their fullpotential due to inefficient ergonomics. With the advent of integration in the OR, floor plans are beingdesigned ahead of construction. This allows boom placement to be integrated with the rest of the OR,allowing for optimal boom functionality and maximized usage. In addition, booms are continuouslydeveloped to be smaller and more flexible, with an increased weight capacity. Recently released surgicalbooms have the ability to rotate up to 360 degrees, include brake systems and have increased arm lengths.Originally, surgical booms were designed to be mounted from the wall or the ceiling in order to utilizeroom space and support operating room equipment. However, modern surgical booms are mounted almostexclusively on operating room ceilings. Consequently, a sturdy ceiling support structure must be in placebefore a surgical boom can be installed in an OR. Since installing such a structure is expensive, surgicalbooms are generally installed in newly constructed operating rooms or ones that are undergoing a majorrenovation.OR booms are included in every integrated OR, although there are significant differences in style betweenmanufacturers. Typically, an integrated OR will have two boom arms for surgical lighting and displays,respectively, which together are referred to as surgical booms, and an anesthesia boom for gas, electricityand an anesthesia machine. Hybrid rooms may have five or more booms. Usually these hybrid roomsinclude multiple equipment booms on top of an anesthesia boom and a utility boom.