Global Ultrapure Water Industry

Global Ultrapure Water Industry

  • September 2020 •
  • 385 pages •
  • Report ID: 5799855 •
  • Format: PDF
Manufacturing Consumes 40% of Water Consumption. Ultrapure Water Market to Reach $7.8 Billion

The global market for Ultrapure Water is projected to reach US$7.8 billion by 2025 trailing a3.6% CAGR driven by its importance in manufacturing processes. Tough guidelines and the need to comply with quality standards require manufacturers to use high-purity water purified to stringent specifications. Ultrapure water, also termed as highly purified water or high-purity water, is free from all contaminants and conforms to strict guidelines regarding purity. Typical contaminants that need to be removed from the feed water include particulate matter, dissolved impurities, suspended solids, bacteria, particles, reactive or inert gases, inorganic or organic matter, and ions like boron and silica. The term ultrapure water gained attention during the late 1970s and the early 1980s as a means to describe the quality of water used across industries such as semiconductor, pharmaceutical and power generation. Ultrapure water differs from de-ionized water as it is free from dissolved gases and organic matter.

Ultrapure water is required to be treated to ensure compliance with various quality standards followed by end-user industries including semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, solar PV, power generation and various specialty applications like research laboratories. Participants across these industries have specific requirements and quality standards. Since semiconductor facilities use ultrapure water as cleaning agent, the water must be free from dissolved contaminants leading to precipitation, or particles resulting in microchip failures. While the pharmaceutical industry uses ultrapure water as product ingredient or cleaning agent, the power industry uses the water for making steam to propel steam turbines. Water used in the pharmaceutical and power industries must be free from viruses, microbes and end toxins. Ultrapure water is produced by treatment of standard water through a series of processes intended to remove all contaminants present as dissolved impurities, particulate matter, dissolved reactive or inert gases, and inorganic or organic compounds. The treatment of ultrapure water involves stringent purification methods covering multiple stages. There are three standard processes including the pre-treatment, primary and polishing stages. The purified water from the pre-treatment stage is further treated in the primary stage, and eventually made contaminant-free in the polishing stage using electro-deionization and ion exchange methods.

The market is projected to expand steadily by the end of the forecast period due to strong demand from major end-use industries, technological advancements and stringent regulations. In the coming years, growth is anticipated to be fueled by increasing applications, rising adoption owing to high degree of customization, strong demand from clean room practices and expansion of the semiconductor industry. While intense competition remains a key restraint, rising investment in wafer washing across developing countries and increasing deployment of supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal-fired plants are slated to provide new growth opportunities. Technological advances like the adoption of membrane processes coupled with rising demand for highly purified water from various industry verticals, especially in the manufacturing sector will contribute towards market growth. The semiconductor industry is the primary contributor to growth of the global market owing to extensive consumption of ultrapure water in wafer fabrication and clean room practices. Manufacturers of semiconductor chips use ultrapure water during wafer production for wafer itching, washing and cleaning processes. Ultrapure water is an integral component of power generation plants and plays a vital role in coal-fired power plants as a result of increasing adoption of supercritical boilers. The increasing demand for energy, particularly in developing countries, is also driving consumption of ultrapure water in power plants. Ultrapure water also finds use in specialty, flat panel display and solar PV manufacturing industries along with gas turbines, clean room practices and research laboratories.